Reading Lists (Up to Season Two)

RORY GILMORE’S READING LIST

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

The Second Sex by Simone de Beauvoir

Mistress of Mellyn by Victoria Holt

Chikara!: A Sweeping Novel of Japan and America by Skimin

Moby Dick by Herman Melville

Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert

The Little Match Girl by Hans Christian Anderson

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy

The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky

To the Christian Nobility of the German Nation by Martin Luther

A Mencken Chrestomathy by H.L. Mencken

The Days of H.L. Mencken by H.L. Mencken

Christopher Marlowe (perhaps Faustus or Edward the Second)

Francis Bacon (The New Atlantis?)

Ben Jonson (perhaps Volpone, or his poetry)

John Webster (perhaps The White Devil or The Duchess of Malfi)

Sonnets by William Shakespeare

Macbeth by William Shakespeare

The Oxford Shakespeare

Who’s Who and What’s What in Shakespeare by Evangeline M. O’Connor

A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf

Collected Poems by Emily Dickinson

Emma by Jane Austen

Charlotte Bronte (probably Jane Eyre)

Hell’s Angels by Hunter S. Thompson (a strong contender as the book Dean lent her)

The Glass Menagerie by Tenneesee Williams

The Group by Mary McCarthy

Backlash: The Undeclared War Against American Women by Susan Faludi (implied)

Stiffed: The Betrayal of the American Man by Susan Faludi

The Portable Dorothy Parker by Dorothy Parker

The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum (inferred because she read later books series)

Swann’s Way by Marcel Proust

Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman

New Poems of Emily Dickinson edited by William H. Shurr

The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath edited by Karen V. Kukil

Rapunzel by The Brothers Grimm

Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes

The Compact Edition of the Oxford English Dictionary

The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath (inferred)

The Art of Eating by M.F.K. Fisher

Ulysses by James Joyce (inferred)

James Joyce’s Ulysses: A Study by Stuart Gilbert

Out of Africa by Isak Dinesen

The Art of Fiction by Henry James

Daisy Miller by Henry James (inferred as it’s later mentioned)

Secrets of the Flesh: A Life of Colette by Judith Thurman

Isak Dinesen: The Life of a Storyteller by Judith Thurman (probable)

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court by Mark Twain (probable)

Elmer Gantry by Sinclair Lewis

Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage by Lord Byron

Writings and Discourses of Mussolini by Benito Mussolini

The Optimist’s Daughter by Eudora Welty

John Adams by David McCullough (inferred)

Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf

Selected Letters of Dawn Powell 1913-1965 edited by Tim Page

Howl and Other Poems by Allen Ginsberg

Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens

The Jeeves series by P.G. Wodehouse (at least one is probable)

Savage Beauty: The Life of Edna St Vincent Millay by Nancy Milford

The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner

The Last Empire: Essays 1992-200 by Gore Vidal

The Collected Stories of Eudora Welty by Eudora Welty

Poems of Anne Sexton (inferred)

Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood by Rebecca Wells (strongly implied)

Memoirs of a Dutiful Daughter by Simone de Beauvoir

The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare

Unfinished Business: Memoirs by John Houseman (selected chapters)

Summer of Fear by T. Jefferson Parker

The Scarecrow of Oz by L. Frank Baum

Contact by Carl Sagan

The Apocalyptics: Cancer and the Big Lie by Edith Efron

Working by Studs Terkel

Three Tales by Gustave Flaubert (my pick as the most likely volume Richard gave her)

The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand

Ernest Hemingway (probably one of the shorter works, as she doesn’t like him)

The Mourning Bride by William Congreve

In the Shadow of Young Girls in Flower by Marcel Proust (possibly implied)

The Guermantes Way by Marcel Proust (the most probable volume)

Inherit the Wind by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee

Letters to a Young Poet by Rainer Maria Rilke

Franny and Zooey by J.D. Salinger

Candide by Voltaire

Please Kill Me: The Uncensored Oral History of Punk by Legs McNeil and Gillian McCain

The Little Locksmith by Katharine Butler Hathaway

The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calvaras County by Mark Twain (implied)

The Lottery by Shirley Jackson

Girl, Interrupted by Susanna Kaysen (possible)

The Inferno by Dante (probable)

LORELAI GILMORE’S READING LIST

On the Road by Jack Kerouac

The Shining by Stephen King (inferred, it’s her favourite film based on a King novel)

Mommie Dearest by Christina Crawford (internal evidence suggests it’s the book)

Kitchen Confidential by Anthony Bourdain

Edith Wharton (perhaps The Age of Innocence)

The Crucible by Arthur Miller

Judy Blume

Timeline by Michael Crichton (possible)

Swann’s Way by Marcel Proust (just the first section)

Women Who Run with the Wolves by Clarissa Pinkola Estes

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Charles Dickens

Tuesdays With Morrie by Mitch Albom

Nancy Drew series by Carolyn Keene

Hansel and Gretel by The Brothers Grimm

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

Everybody’s Autobiography by Gertrude Stein

The Monk by M.G. Lewis

The Gospel According to Jesus Christ by José Saramago

Secrets of the Flesh: A Life of Colette by Judith Thurman

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

Who Moved My Cheese?, by Dr Spencer Johnson

Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

Memoirs of a Dutiful Daughter by Simone de Beauvoir (speculation)

Call Me Crazy by Anne Heche (probable)

Essentials of Economics by Bradley R. Schiller

Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell

The Children’s Hour by Lillian Hellman

The Final Days by Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward (possible)

Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett

The Dirt by Motley Crue

What Color is Your Parachute? by Richard Nelson Bolles

The Portable Nietzsche by Friedrich Nietzsche

The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calvaras County by Mark Twain

The Lottery by Shirley Jackson (implied)

JESS MARIANO’S READING LIST

On the Road by Jack Kerouac

Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thompson

Howl and Other Poems by Allen Ginsberg

Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger (probable)

Ernest Hemingway

The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand

Franny and Zooey by J.D. Salinger

Notes of a Dirty Old Man by Charles Bukowski

Jane Austen

Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut

Please Kill Me: The Uncensored Oral History of Punk by Legs McNeil and Gillian McCain

Othello by William Shakespeare

The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test by Tom Wolfe

People and Works Referenced More Than Once in Gilmore Girls (Up to Season Two)

Women

Christiane Amanpour

Pamela Anderson

Jane Austen

Simone de Beauvoir

Bjork

Anita Bryant

Mariah Carey

Cher

Colette

Joan Crawford

Emily Dickinson

Celine Dion

Enya

Ella Fitzgerald

Zsa Zsa Gabor

Judy Garland

P.J. Harvey

Lillian Hellman

Barbara Hutton

Carole King

Ricki Lake

Jennifer Lopez

Courtney Love

Madonna

Carmen Miranda

Marilyn Monroe

Nico

Yoko Ono

Dorothy Parker

Sam Phillips

Sylvia Plath

Emily Post

Dawn Powell

Britney Spears

Meryl Streep

Martha Stewart

Barbra Streisand

Elizabeth Taylor

The Virgin Mary

Barbara Walters

Eudora Welty

Virginia Woolf

Men

Abbot and Costello

Woody Allen

Kevin Bacon

Beck

Matthew Broderick

Mel Brooks

Charles Bukowski

Chang and Eng Bunker

George Clooney

Elvis Costello

Kevin Costner

James Dean

Charles Dickens

Fyodor Dostoevsky

William Faulkner

Sigmund Freud

William Randolph Hearst

King Henry VIII

William Holden

Hubert Humphrey

Michael Jackson

Henry James

Jesus Christ

Pope John-Paul II

James Joyce

Ted Kaczynski

John F. Kennedy

Stephen King

John Lennon

Baz Luhrman

David Lynch

Barry Manilow

Charles Manson

Arthur Miller

Benito Mussolini

Paul Newman

Richard Nixon

Charlie Parker

Sean Penn

Regis Philbin

Grant Lee Phillips

Brad Pitt

Iggy Pop

Elvis Presley

Prince

Paul Revere

J.D. Salinger

William Shakespeare

Frank Sinatra

Steven Spielberg

Sylvester Stallone

Hunter S. Thompson

John Travolta

Mark Twain

Tom Waits

Books

Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? by Edward Albee

Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Alborn

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes

The Mourning Bride by William Congreve

Howl and Other Poems by Allen Ginsberg

Hansel and Gretel by The Brothers Grimm

Rapunzel by The Brothers Grimm

The Iliad by Homer

The Sketchbook of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent by Washington Irving

Nancy Drew series by Carolyn Keene

On the Road by Jack Kerouac

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

Paul Revere’s Ride by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

A Mencken Chrestomathy by H.L. Mencken

The Crucible by Arthur MIller

Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell

Remembrance of Things Past by Marcel Proust

The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand

Hamlet by William Shakespeare

Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare

Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy

Secrets of the Flesh: A Life of Colette by Judith Thurman

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

The Last Empire by Gore Vidal

Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut

The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams

A Streetcar Named Desire by Tenneessee Williams

The Bible

The Compact Oxford English Dictionary

Comics

Peanuts

Superman

Periodicals

Cosmopolitan

GQ

InStyle

Jane

The New York Times

The New Yorker

The Wall Street Journal

The Washington Post

Films

Babe

Bambi

The Boy in the Plastic Bubble

Cinderella

David and Lisa

The Deer Hunter

Dr Dolittle

Fatal Attraction

Footloose

Frankenstein

Fried Green Tomatoes

Funny Girl

Ghostbusters

Glitter

The Godfather series

Grease

Heathers

The Horse Whisperer

How the Grinch Stole Christmas

The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939)

Invasion of the Body Snatchers

The Little Rascals

Mary Poppins

The Matrix

Midnight Express

The Miracle Worker

Monty Python and The Holy Grail

Oklahoma!

The Outsiders

Rebel Without a Cause

The Rocky Horror Picture Show

Rosemary’s Baby

Say It Isn’t So

The Shining

Sixteen Candles

Sleeping Beauty

Stalag 17

Star Wars

A Streetcar Named Desire

Tears and Laughter: The Joan and Melissa Rivers Story

West Side Story

The Wizard of Oz

The Yearling

Bands

98°

Ash

B-52s

The Bangles

The Beatles

The Bee Gees

Belle and Sebastian

Black Sabbath

Blondie

The Cure

Duran Duran

Foo Fighters

The Go-Go’s

Grandaddy

Grant Lee Buffalo

Metallica

Motley Crue

NSYNC

Pixies

Rolling Stones

The Sex Pistols

The Spice Girls

Steely Dan

U2

Van Halen

The Velvet Underground

Wilco

XTC

Albums

Wasp Star (Apple Venus Volume 2) – XTC

Songs

What a Wonderful World – Louis Armstrong; Joey Ramone

I Can’t Get Started – Ella Fitzgerald

Someone to Watch Over Me – Rickie Lee Jones; Marty and Elayne

Where You Lead – Carole King

It’s a Small World After All – Richard and Robert Sherman

We Are Family – Sister Sledge

Teach Me Tonight – Dinah Washington

My Little Corner of the World – Yo La Tengo

Television

All in the Family

The Andy Griffith Show

BattleBots

The Brady Bunch

Charlie’s Angels

The Facts of Life

Get Smart

Happy Days

I Love Lucy

Jeopardy

Joanie Loves Chachi

Lassie

Looney Tunes

The Mary Tyler Moore Show

Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom

The Odd Couple

The Oprah Winfrey Show

The Powerpuff Girls

Saved By the Bell

Star Trek

This Old House

The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson

The Twilight Zone

Twin Peaks

Wheel of Fortune

Wonder Woman

Books, Periodicals, and Comics Referenced in Season Two

Novels

The Scarecrow of Oz by L. Frank Baum

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There by Lewis Carroll

Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens

The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky

Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esquivel

The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner

Nancy Drew series by Carolyn Keene

On the Road by Jack Kerouac

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

Elmer Gantry by Sinclair Lewis

Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell

Summer of Fear by T. Jefferson Parker

Novels 1930-42 by Dawn Powell (collection)

The Guermantes Way by Marcel Proust

The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand

Baron Munchausen’s Narrative of his Marvellous Travels and Campaigns in Russia by R.E. Raspe

Contact by Carl Sagan

The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

The Gospel According to Jesus Christ by José Saramago

Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thompson

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

A Connecticut Yankee at King Arthur’s Court by Mark Twain

Candide by Voltaire

Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut

Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood by Rebecca Wells

The Optimist’s Daughter by Eudora Welty

Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm by Kate Douglas Wiggin

Jeeves series by P.G. Wodehouse

The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test by Tom Wolfe

Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf

Stories

Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown (picture book)

The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

Hansel and Gretel by The Brothers Grimm

Rapunzel by The Brothers Grimm

Snow-White and Rose-Red by The Brothers Grimm

The Sketchbook of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent by Washington Irving (collection)

The Lottery by Shirley Jackson

Franny and Zooey by J.D. Salinger (collection)

The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County by Mark Twain

Collected Stories by Eudora Welty (collection)

Poetry

Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage by Lord Byron

The Inferno by Dante

Howl and Other Poems by Allen Ginsberg (collection)

The Iliad by Homer

Paul Revere’s Ride by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

A Visit from St Nicholas by Clement Clarke Moore

Drama

Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? by Edward Albee

Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett

The Mourning Bride by William Congreve

The Children’s Hour by Lillian Hellman

Inherit the Wind by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee

The Crucible by Arthur Miller

Macbeth by William Shakespeare

Othello by William Shakespeare

Richard III by William Shakespeare

Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare

The Glass Menagerie by Tenneessee Williams

Non-Fiction

Tuesdays With Morrie by Mitch Alborn

The Final Days by Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward

Memoirs of a Dutiful Daughter by Simone de Beauvoir

What Color is Your Parachute? by Richard Nelson Bolles

Notes of a Dirty Old Man by Charles Bukowski

The Apocalyptics by Edith Efron

The Little Locksmith by Katharine Butler Hathaway

Call Me Crazy by Anne Heche

Unfinished Business by John Houseman

Who Moved My Cheese? by Spencer Johnson

Please Kill Me: The Uncensored Oral History of Punk by Legs McNeil and Gillian McCain

A Mencken Chrestomathy by H.L. Mencken (collection)

Savage Beauty: The Life of Edna St Vincent Millay by Nancy Milford

Tough Love by Bill Milliken

The Dirt: Confessions of the World’s Most Notorious Rock Band by Motley Crue

Writings and Discourses by Benito Mussolini (collection)

The Portable Nietzsche by Friedrich Nietzsche (collection)

Selected Letters of Dawn Powell edited by Tim Page

Etiquette by Emily Post

Letters to a Young Poet by Rainer Maria Rilke

Personal Memoirs of General W.T. Sherman by William T. Sherman

Essentials of Economics by Bradley R. Schiller

Working by Studs Terkel

Secrets of the Flesh: A Life of Colette by Judith Thurman

The Last Empire by Gore Vidal (collection)

Reference

The Bible

The Compact Oxford English Dictionary

Shrimad Bhagavad Gita

The Mojo Collection edited by Jim Irvin

Newspapers

The Daily Racing Form

The Hartford Courant

National Enquirer

The New York Times

The Wall Street Journal

The Washington Post

Magazines

GQ

InStyle Weddings

Jane

The New Yorker

Punk Planet

Rolling Stone

Seventeen

Spin

Teen

Vanity Fair

Your Magazine

Comics

Batman

Garfield

Superman

Authors

Jane Austen

W.E.B. Du Bois

Gustave Flaubert

Sigmund Freud

Ernest Hemingway

Henry James

Frank Kafka

M.G. Lewis

Dorothy Parker

Harold Pinter

Anne Sexton

Harriet Beecher Stowe

Seneca the Younger

“Fourth rung of hell”

RORY: Fourth rung of hell, party of one.

LORELAI: Well, at least my feet won’t get cold.

Rory references the Inferno, the first part of Italian writer Dante Alighieri’s 14th century epic poem, the Divine Comedy. The Inferno describes Dante’s journey through Hell, guided by the ancient Roman poet, Virgil. In the poem, Hell is described as nine concentric circles of torment located within the Earth.

It is not certain from this whether Rory has actually read the book, although it doesn’t seem unlikely that she has. There are circles of Hell in the poem, not “rungs”, and the fourth circle of Hell is for the miserly, the hoarders of wealth, and those who squandered it – not people gloating over relationship break ups (those are dealt with in the next part, the Purgatorio). However, that could very easily be a bit of artistic licence on Rory’s part.

Lorelai possibly gives away that she hasn’t read the poem when she says her feet won’t get cold. In fact, the final circle of Hell is a huge frozen lake. Hell does actually freeze over. The frozen lake is reserved for the traitors, who remain trapped in the ice, and in the very centre of the lake is Lucifer, who was a traitor to Heaven.

“Tunneling out of here with a spoon”

LORELAI: Aw, look at you, trying to make Mommy feel like you don’t spend every night tunneling out of here with a spoon.

Lorelai references Escape from Alcatraz, 1979 prison thriller film directed by Don Spiegel. It’s an adaptation of the 1963 non-fiction book of the same name by J. Campbell Bruce, and dramatises the 1962 prisoner escape from the maximum security prison on Alcatraz Island, off the shore of San Francisco.

The film stars Clint Eastwood as Frank Morris, an extremely intelligent criminal who forms an escape plan with a few other prisoners. Over the next few months, they dig through their cell walls with spoons, make papier-mache dummies to act as decoys, and construct a raft out of raincoats. The film implies the escape was successful, although that is not certain (recent evidence seems to suggest the men did survive).

Escape from Alcatraz was a commercial success and well received by critics. It is often considered one of the best films of 1979.

Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm

RORY: I guess the thought of just being nice to people never occurred to you, huh?

PARIS: See, that is exactly what I need from you, Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm for the new millennium. Hey, wear some braids tomorrow with bows. I mean, hell, let’s sell it, sister!

Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, a 1903 classic children’s book by Kate Douglas Wiggin. The main character is Rebecca Rowena Randall, an imaginative and charming little girl from a poor family, sent to live with her aunts, Miranda and Jane Sawyer, in the fictional village of Riverboro, Maine. Miranda is stern with Rebecca, while Jane is kindly and finds Rebecca’s lively nature refreshing. However, Aunt Miranda will eventually prove how much she values Rebecca.

Like Rory, Rebecca is a brunette from a small town, and eventually becomes a very good student, especially in English, as well as talented writer.

The book was turned into a stage play, and was made into a film three times, most notably in 1938, starring Shirley Temple. However, Paris seems to be describing the book rather than a film, as the films don’t show Rebecca with the braids and bows of the book, preferring curly-headed heroines.

Tough Love

DEAN: Why don’t we just bring [Lorelai] something out?

RORY: No. She and Luke have been in this fight for too long, she’s gotta do this.

DEAN: You’re cruel.

RORY: Tough love, baby.

Tough love is the act of treating a person harshly or sternly with the intent to help them in the long run. It is thought that the phrase originated with the 1968 book Tough Love by Christian community activist Bill Milliken, who worked with at-risk youth to keep them engaged with the education system.

Dean describing Rory as “cruel” seems quite apt, considering the dishonest basis of their relationship at this point.

Girl, Interrupted

RORY: I’ll tell you what, Sookie. How about Lane and I come up with a few more suggestions for you? Still melodic, but not quite as Girl, Interrupted.

Girl, Interrupted, a 1999 psychological drama film directed by James Mangold, and based on the 1993 memoir of the same name by Susanna Kaysen. The memoir’s title comes from the Vermeer painting, Girl, Interrupted at Her Music. The film is set in New England in the 1960s, and follows a young woman, played by Winona Ryder, who spends 18 months in a psychiatric facility after a suicide attempt.

The film received only lukewarm reviews, with most of the praise for the performance of Angelina Jolie, who plays a sociopath. Jolie won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. The author, Susanna Kaysen, didn’t like the film, accusing James Mangold of adding too many invented, melodramatic scenes. Mangold rewrote the story as a parallel to The Wizard of Oz.

It seems possible that Rory could have read the book, either before or after the film came out. Not only does she enjoy female memoir and autobiography, but Susanna Kaysen was admitted to the same private psychiatric hospital where Sylvia Plath and Anne Sexton were treated, as well as John Nash.

44th Street

TOURIST: Excuse me, I’m so sorry to bother you. Which way is 44th?

RORY: Oh, um, that way.

44th Street is two blocks north of the bus terminal, and Rory has sent the tourist south instead. As Jess says, they will hopefully soon notice that the street numbers are getting smaller rather than bigger, and turn around. (The tourist made a rookie mistake by not asking at least one other person for directions!).

44th Street is in the theatre district, with numerous hotels, clubs and restaurants the tourist may have been looking for. It’s also the site of The Algonquin Hotel, at 59 West 44th Street, so this minor interaction feels like a hidden homage to Dorothy Parker.

“The early bird”

MAN: Wow, you’re hours early.

LORELAI: Yeah, well, I just wanted to beat traffic and have time to get ready and relax, and also, I’ve heard the early bird gets the unwrinkled gowns without the mysterious stains in them.

Lorelai plays with the common English proverb, “The early bird catches the worm”, meaning that the first people to arrive are most likely to nab the best stuff, or that the earlier you begin a task, the more likely you are to succeed at it before others. It’s first found in a 17th century collection of proverbs, suggesting that it was already an old and well-known saying.